Noel Dong

— A visual diary

The Ancient Ghost Forest at Neskowin

The tides are something I’ve been keeping a close eye on in the last few years, mainly to check out the marine life in tide pools, but recently I’ve come across an amazing phenomenon that had to be seen to be believed.

In the small town of Neskowin, off the northern Oregon Coast, there lies a ghost forest that only becomes visible at low tide. According to literature I’ve read on the topic, the forest was created when an earthquake of the Cascadia subduction zone abruptly collapsed a forest of Sitka Spruce trees, that were then covered by mud from landslides or debris from a tsunami. The forest itself was exposed again recently during turbulent storms that occurred during the winter of 1997-1998 - resulting in the ghost forest we see today at low tide. According to carbon dating the forest itself is well over 2,000 years old.

Obviously, I had to go see this in person and capture what would be a beautifully haunting experience.

  Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area & the Sand Lake Recreation Area

Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area & the Sand Lake Recreation Area

While on the way south to Neskowin from Portland, we stopped into the Cape Kiwanda State Natural Area and the Sand Lake Recreation Area.

  My mate Vinh who came along for the trip.

My mate Vinh who came along for the trip.

When we finally made it to Neskowin a thick fog rolled in - it made the ghost forest seem like a literal one.

  George and the last we saw of the sunset

George and the last we saw of the sunset

 Proposal Rock - another feature of beautiful Neskowin

Proposal Rock - another feature of beautiful Neskowin

 The ghost forest is revealed.

The ghost forest is revealed.

Unfortunately for us the fog made it hard to see while also bringing along with it the cold - so we called it a night and headed on back to Portland.